Keep Rugs Beautiful Jordan's Furniture offers these tips for care of rugs and runners. Care and Maintenance for Area Rugs Professional cleaning is recommended when rugs are soiled. Rugs should be vacuumed regularly to remove dirt and abrasive particles. Avoid vacuuming fringe and side selvage areas. Vacuuming the fringe can result in it becoming shredded or torn away from the body of the rug. Hooked rugs and braided rugs should be vacuumed using the "bare floor" setting on the vacuum to prevent damage. Using a beater bar (that's designed for use on a rug or carpet setting) can snag loose fibers and cause pulls and runs in the surface. Rotating rugs 180 degrees annually will alternate wear patterns. The use of furniture cups under extra-heavy furniture helps prevent permanent damage to rug fibers. Rug Padding Quality rug pads provide support and stability to the area rug, ensuring better performance and appearance. Rubber- bottom rug pads keep rugs from slipping and moving. Quality solid surface rug pads (not thin or waffled mesh pads) will protect the surface of the floor underneath, minimizing scratching and damage to floor finishes. Quality solid surface rug pads (not thin or waffled mesh pads) prevent dye transfer from the area rug to floors underneath- including wall-to-wall carpet. Quality solid surface rug pads with anti- slip rubber bottoms keep rugs from creeping, wrinkling and cupping under furniture legs. Quality solid surface rug pads with anti-slip rubber bottoms prevent rugs from being stretched out of shape. Quality rug pads with a rubber bottom layer prevent moisture stains from seeping through the rug, damaging floors- great for homes with pets! Thin vinyl rug pads (non-skid or waffle) can stick to the floor over time, or create excess heat build-up under rugs, damaging floors. Rubber pads are recommended as they "breathe" and are less likely to stick or affect hard surfaces. On the Surface: Pilling, Shedding, Sprouts and Pulls New area rugs can shed excess yarns through pilling and shedding. Certain types of rugs, such as tufted rugs, are more prone to shedding. Frequent, thorough vacuuming can reduce shedding time. Customers with allergies might consider machine woven and hand knotted rugs instead, as these rug types are less likely to shed fibers. Yarns that extend up from the surface of the rug pile-"sprouts and pulls"- should be cut with sharp scissors as needed. Pulling on sprouted yarns in a hooked rug can result in permanent damage. Dye Variations Dye Variations: In many rug types, especially handmade rugs, horizontal dye variations are to be expected. Known as abrash, it sometimes appears to have a "striped" look. Due to the natural variations in the dyes, as found in hand knotted rugs, or intentionally woven into the pile, abrash adds to the wonderfully rustic appearance of the rug. Odors: That "New Rug Smell" Most new furniture, including rugs, often has an odor. The odor is not harmful, and will dissipate in a short amount of time. Air out the room by opening doors and windows if possible to reduce the smell of the new furniture. Using dryer sheets, or coffee grinds in an open container, near the furniture can help neutralize any odors.
Get advice on how to care for area rugs and rug padding, including tips to prevent rug wear and reduce pilling, from the experts at Jordan's Furniture.
Get advice on how to care for area rugs and rug padding, including tips to prevent rug wear and reduce pilling, from the experts at Jordan's Furniture.
Rugs are a fantastic way to define a space. Choosing a rug for your dining space might seem overwhelming at first, but if you’re mindful of the following three design tips you’ll shop confidently. Fabrication || If the rug is going in your main dining area then it will need to withstand frequent foot traffic. The two best fabrications are Hand Tufted and Machine Woven. Both fabrications are durable and stain resistant. Hand Tufted is only available in wool and can shed excess fibers when new so be sure to vacuum frequently at first! Machine Woven is available in synthetic fabrics and is great for those suffering with allergies. If your dining space is in an area that sees a lot of sunlight synthetic is the way to go as it won’t fade as fast. Pattern & Color || The rug is the foundation of the space. Choose whether or not you want the rug to make a statement or simply enhance the furniture. If you are just starting to design your dining space, a rug is a great way to determine your color story. Patterned rugs will feature multiple colors which gives you the opportunity to incorporate a few different hues into your overall design. Spaces that are already saturated with design or color are better suited for a rug in muted hues and subtle patterns. Shapes & Sizes || All legs of the chairs should remain on the rug even when the chair is pulled away from the table. No one enjoys taking a seat and having their chair get tripped up because the rug is too small. When measuring your table and chairs, add 18” – 24” to the measurements to ensure this doesn’t happen. Square tables should always be placed on a square rug, while round tables could be placed on either a round or square rug. Rectangular tables are best on a rectangular rug to play up the shape. Don’t forget the rug pad! Not only will it prevent the rug from sliding around, it will also protect your floors and extend the life of your rug. Rug pads will last forever and can be used interchangeably as long as the rug size and shape stays the same.     
Blue & White || From nautical navy and white to chinoiserie patterns, this combo always looks fresh Certain color combinations have truly stood the test of time, none more so than blue and white. When it comes to interiors – outdoors, too – blue and white always looks fresh, cool, crisp and sophisticated. From bold, poolside cabana striped draperies to richly-patterned chinoiserie vases and ginger jars, this timeless pairing works equally well in solid blocks of color or intricate patterns. It's particularly strong in cooling down summer outside settings, but for warmth and zing, add orange, pink or yellow. And, you can use blue and white in any room – think of a guest bedroom covered in French toile de jouy (twal-duh-zhwee) fabric, the aforementioned chinoiserie vases scattered around a living room, or a serene bedroom with muted versions of blue with white for comforters, pillows, and window treatments. However you incorporate it, blue and white just feels right. However you incorporate it, blue and white just feels right. Sky-View Seats || It's not surprising…according to many surveys, America's favorite color is blue. It's almost never jarring, but calm and cool, though it does feel more energetic in saturated versions of navy, royal blue, and turquoise. And, it's readily available on upholstered furniture, from dining and accent chairs to upholstered beds, sofas and ottomans, as well as every kind of accessory. Metal or wicker outdoor furniture is often painted white, with classic navy blue cushions for an inviting summer look.   Coastal Connotations || There's nothing better than relaxing by the ocean, lake or pool. Blue sky, blue water, white sand – we're intrinsically drawn to these coastal hues because they are so prevalent in nature. And even though grey is an enduring color go-to, we don't long for a grey sky the way we do blue. You can create coastal vibes in any room using blue and white, especially if you mix in variations like cornflower, periwinkle or powder blue. Sometimes you can find many variations in one area rug that can act as a springboard for creating an oasis of calm.   Cool Accents || If you have a neutral-hued room, add some color with blue patterned pillows, and for porch, deck or patio, get them in Sunbrella weather-resistant fabrics. For dining, set a table with blue and white patterned dinnerware mixed with cobalt water goblets, plus blue and white floral table linens for a fresh look. Typically, bathrooms are white, so towels and rugs with blue in them beautifully complement white tile and porcelain. Or, try painting a light blue ceiling in a white room for a tranquil feeling every time you look up. This technique is often used to great effect on porches, where Southern tradition says a "haint blue" ceiling will ward off evil spirits.
If variety is the spice of life, you won't find a more colorful and diverse design mix than in Morocco. Often recognized for its extravagantly patterned tiles and popular ottoman poufs in every gorgeous hue you can imagine, Moroccan style encompasses so much more. Drawing from its blend of African Berber, Islamic, Spanish and French cultural history, the Moroccan look offers global sophistication using hand-crafted items infused with exotic details. If you don't happen to have an authentic riad of your own, you can still create the look and feel in your home Textiles & Accents || Moroccan rugs and poufs are the most popular items in home interiors, and are readily available stateside. Moroccan rugs come in every color, size and shape, and the soft, neutral-hued ones coordinate beautifully with boho-inspired rooms. You can easily hang a group of pierced metal lanterns in a bedroom, place a carved drum table in your living room or add striped spice-tone throw pillows to your sofa. As with any space, it's all about the mix. If you use too many Moroccan style items in a room, it might look like a stage set, which is fine if that's your ultimate goal. Colors & More Colors || Typically, we think of Moroccan color palettes as consisting of warm spice tones like orange, red, saffron yellow and versions of brown, but there are many variations originating from different regions of the country. Jewel tones like sapphire, emerald and ruby are often mixed freely, and some traditional Islamic color palettes combine deep cobalt with turquoise, tan and white. In addition, many Moroccan rugs have a white or off-white ground with free-form, open geometric patterns in black or brown. Shapes & Patterns || From iconic Moorish arches and arabesque domes to hexagonal and octagonal wooden tables, Morocco is all about shapes... keyholes, fish scales, and intricate open lattice and trellis patterns are also abundant. In addition to amazing architectural shapes, many geometrics are prominent on tiles and textiles. For example, multiple layers of Zellige tiles are widely displayed in Islamic mosques, in a kaleidoscope of patterns and color combinations. They look similar to azulejo tiles you'd see in Spain and Portugal.
What once was a faux pas has now become an edgy home design trend that we like to call the art of mixing patterns and textures. Much like fashion, the common fear when it comes to experimenting with design trends is the fear of the unknown. You see it in a magazine and think “I love the way this looks, but this won’t work in my home” but it COULD as long as you keep these tips in mind… Variety in Scale || Think in order of large to small when picking your patterns. The larger patterns should be chosen in the form of your rug, drapes, accent chair, or any other large scale pieces in the room so the entire print is visible. This pattern will be the most impactful one in the room so be sure you pick one that you won’t get tired of or in an element that can easily be switched out such as drapes or an area rug. Once you have the large pattern you can start to layer in those smaller patterns or textures; three is ideal but no more than five depending on the size of the room. Layering in Texture || If your two patterns are the main focal point in the room, incorporating texture for the third layer will not only add depth to your design, it will also thread everything together. Just be mindful when choosing the intensity of the texture so it doesn’t compete with the prints you’ve chosen. The same rule applies if you decide to focus on two bold textures; keep the pattern light and subtle so it enhances the overall look. A Common Thread || Fluidity in design is key when mixing patterns and textures. This can be achieved by establishing a solid foundation and threading each layer of your design together with a common element whether it is color or theme of print. Example: a geometric printed rug paired with a heavily textured sofa decorated with floral pillows; staying within a common color scheme will harmonize the prints and texture flawlessly.
Few core items you use to decorate your home are as important as area rugs. In addition to setting the tone for your space, they need to be durable, especially in high-traffic areas, and they should tie a room's colors and style together with tireless beauty. And, if placed over hardwood floors, they offer protection, warmth and comfort underfoot. Many designers suggest creating a scheme for your room using the colors and patterns of your rug, though there are so many styles available, it's easy enough to find a rug that complements what you already have in your space. When choosing an area rug, consider other shapes besides rectangles, think of abstract designs vs. traditional patterns, and, depending on space, you can use more than one in the same room. As always, if your rug is on a hardwood floor, be sure to use a rug pad underneath to prevent slipping. Alternative Shapes || Look around your room. It's most likely square or rectangular. Much of your case furniture is probably similar in shape. So why not counteract the 90-degree angles with a rug that's oval instead of rectangular? Or, round or hexagonal? You could even go with a figural-shaped rug, maybe shaped like a surfboard or hibiscus flower if it's a tropical-themed bathroom. Since an area rug really anchors your space, you should choose one that inspires you, and that you love to look at every day. Patterns vs. Solids/Abstracts || You have endless rug choices to make your space come alive. Traditional, intricate patterns offer visual splendor, and some new rugs are designed to look like vintage antiques, which add a curated, lived-in look to your room. You should also decide if you want rich saturated colors to make a dramatic statement or softer, faded hues to calm things down. Modern abstract patterns or "almost solids" also work beautifully, especially if you want wall art or furniture to really be the stars. In bedrooms, you probably want a rug with a higher pile to keep it warm and toasty. If you're in a more temperate climate, natural fiber rugs like sisal feel and look great, both inside and outside.   Multiples in One Room || If you have a large open space, say, a living room that flows into a dining room, it usually makes sense to place one rug under your dining room furniture, and one under your living room furniture. You can use rugs to further define seating areas. For example, you might have one rug anchoring a sofa and chairs for TV watching, and a separate rug for an adjacent conversation area with chairs arranged around a cocktail table. And, rugs you place in the same room don't have to match, though they should still work with the overall colors and décor of the space to keep everything cohesive.
Whether your goal is to make a style statement, give your feet a cozy treat, or hide a floor blemish, area rugs don’t get enough credit for all they can do to transform a space…. Make a Statement || With all the options out there from traditional oriental, to modern geometric, to bold splashes of color, choosing the rug that is right for your space can be overwhelming! Even if the rug is meant to be the ornamental piece in the room, it still needs to flow with the rest of your design. If you are introducing a new pattern, it should be within the same color scheme of the existing patterns in the room. This will ensure that your contrasting elements complement, as opposed to compete against each other. If you are introducing a bold color, it should share the same undertones as the existing palette in the room (i.e. warm vs. cool hues) whether those colors are neutral or not to keep the look cohesive. Warm the Space || If this décor for your floor is meant to be a plush treat for your feet be sure to pick the pile that best suits your style. A high pile (taller than ¼) will add texture to your space and feel warm and cozy underfoot, however this style is prone to more wear and tear. High pile rugs are great in low traffic areas like the bedroom or living room. A low pile rug (shorter than ¼) is fantastic for higher traffic areas since they are easy to clean and prevent allergens from getting stuck in the fibers. Though not as soft underfoot, a low pile rug will still soften the look of a space and add depth to the overall look. Hide a Flaw || Whether the flaw on your floor exists on tile, hardwood, or even a carpet, an area rug can be a fashionable fix! Contrary to popular belief, layering an area rug over wall-to-wall carpeting is not a faux pas when it's done right. Most wall-to-wall carpeting is fairly neutral so this is your chance to make a statement while hiding whatever blemish exists below! Keep pile in mind – anything too thick will cause a tripping hazard, but don't be afraid to play with different shapes or patterns. This will make the look more like a purposeful design rather than a quick fix to a bigger problem. Don't worry – your secret is safe with us.
PSA: neutral color palettes do not equal boring design. Whether you aren’t a fan of color in general or you’re just simply worried you’ll get tired of colors you choose, there are plenty of ways to make your neutrals dazzle as much as color! Touchable Texture || Add depth to your home by incorporating texture. Layer textiles from throws to pillows – even area rugs! Neutral spaces can look stark sometimes so it’s vital to include textural elements to warm it up a bit. Go beyond textiles and make practical furniture like a bookcase a decorative focal point! This will add dimension without compromising your color palette. Another great way to incorporate texture is to create an entire wall of it! Paneling has made a modern, chic comeback and it’s nothing like the kind you’d find in a 1970’s basement. The d version features varied textural patterns in crisp white, gray, even black. Still not convinced? Shiplap and stonework are a few natural neutral alternatives that will create the same effect. Playful Pattern || The best part of a neutral color theme is that you can really get creative and start mixing patterns! Fluidity in design is key when mixing patterns and textures. This can be achieved by establishing a solid foundation and threading each layer of your design together with a common element; in this case, a neutral color palette. For mixing & matching pattern best practices check out: Pattern Play! The Ombré Effect || Just as you can layer your patterns and texture, you can also layer your neutral colors! Neutrals are neutral for a reason – they play well together! Create an ombré effect in your home by choosing a range of neutral tones to feature from drapes to furniture to flooring. Be mindful of undertones when choosing your palette. Some neutrals can be both cool and warm depending on what they’re styled up against, so to keep the look cohesive you want to stick with one or the other. Even if you aren’t painting, consider getting a few gradient paint chips to guide your choices!
By now, you know about the many benefits of indoor plants – they help purify the air, reduce stress and background noise, and improve your mood, in addition to being naturally beautiful. You can also add life to your space with other naturally occurring items like coral, seashells, petrified wood, geodes, plus textured fibers like macramé, abaca, jute, grasscloth and sisal. Adding these natural elements brings earthy textures to your décor, and increases the tranquility of your space. You can use these elements in subtle or big ways, and they work especially well in casual, boho-inspired interiors. Fish tanks and fountains optional.   Natural Found Collections || You can easily add natural beauty to your home by gathering your seashell or beach rock collection, putting it in a woven basket, and placing it next to a group of plants. A branch of coral is another classic touch, often displayed atop glass coffee tables or on book shelves. Other shore items like starfish, sea urchins and sea glass are inexpensive, readily available collectibles that can be gathered in groups or scattered randomly to charming rustic effect.   Furniture & Rugs || There are plenty of ways to use natural elements to make a bigger impact. In addition to natural wicker, rattan or rope accent furniture, you can complete a seating group with an eye-catching geode-topped accent table or tree stump table that's anything but cookie cutter. Each one will feature unique variations in color, pattern and shape. Ground your space, inside or out, with an environmentally-friendly natural fiber area rug that's both resilient and easy to coordinate with most design schemes. Accent Pieces || Geodes in their organic form can be striking, and appear in many gorgeous colors, including purple, blue, pink and green. Arrange them inside an open clam shell for an artful presentation. The aforementioned coral makes a great decorative accent, maybe on a tray with other objects or under a glass cloche. A natural woven sunburst mirror adds coastal charm when placed above your dresser, or use it to embellish a bare wall in an entranceway. Finally, if natural elements aren't your favorite décor go-tos, framed botanical prints work especially well in a formal grouping on your wall.
There has been an ongoing debate in the Design world about the prevalence of grey in interiors. Is it an enduring trend or past its expiration date? Truthfully, grey never went away. As with any color, it appears and resurfaces at different times. And, unless you intentionally use grey as a monochromatic color scheme, it will have more impact if you mix it with other colors like yellow, lavender or pink ¬– even saturated citron, emerald green or peacock blue. However you decide to incorporate this hue, it can create a sophisticated feel that will stand the test of time. Keep It Neutral || As an alternative to beige, tan or white, grey can either be a great focal point or soothing background to other colors. When you choose a super light value of grey, it can have an ethereal, cloud-like look and feel that even mixes well with other neutrals. For example, your rug can feature only values of grey or include soft blue, white and beige mixed with grey for a more interesting neutral palette. Add a textured throw and pillows along with furniture in shinier finishes to keep your neutral color scheme from looking flat. Power It Up || Amp up the elegance and grandeur of your space by using deeper greys like graphite, charcoal or wrought iron. Contrast them with pale pink, soft lavender or mustard hues, or make a bold statement by mixing grey with amethyst, hot pink or citron. For a more masculine approach, try using grey with brown or burgundy, perhaps on an upholstered chair or with accent pillows. Gold, silver and black in either matte or shiny finishes will also keep grey from feeling too sedate. Finishing Touches || Change up your greys anytime with colorful accents in other colors like red, black, blue or green. For example, incorporate a lamp with a jade base, or a patterned chair with rose, turquoise and terracotta hues to create a beautiful, rich complement to your grey foundation.
This home décor trend is going out to all the wandering souls out there… the color lovers that thrive on wanderlust and exploration. Heavily influenced by Eastern European culture, bohemian style is the art of layering rich colors and textures with globally-inspired patterns, mixing in vintage elements, and topping it off with a dash of opulence to create a look that is effortlessly luxurious… Worldly Patterns || Layer, layer, layer. Boho is all about mixing prints in rich texture and saturated with color to create a warm and cozy vibe that is carelessly chic. Adorn your walls with crocheted tapestry, lay down an oriental rug, and fill your sofa with plush jewel-toned pillows… the result will be a space that’s just begging to be lounged in. Vintage Finds || Part of the appeal of boho style are the one-of-a-kind pieces that are sprinkled throughout the home, but to keep it authentic you must find those vintage treasures that are unique to your personality. Love to travel? Go on the hunt for some vintage suitcases to use as a nightstand or side table. Are you a photography buff? Hit up your local flea market for an antique camera to display in your home. Gilded Accents || Warm gold metallic elements like an étagère or cocktail table creates depth to the design by adding a touch of opulence. You can even introduce little pops of gold by way of planters or artwork! Your metallic accents work as the neutral in the room and will anchor the overall design.