There has been an ongoing debate in the Design world about the prevalence of grey in interiors. Is it an enduring trend or past its expiration date? Truthfully, grey never went away. As with any color, it appears and resurfaces at different times. And, unless you intentionally use grey as a monochromatic color scheme, it will have more impact if you mix it with other colors like yellow, lavender or pink ¬– even saturated citron, emerald green or peacock blue. However you decide to incorporate this hue, it can create a sophisticated feel that will stand the test of time. Keep It Neutral || As an alternative to beige, tan or white, grey can either be a great focal point or soothing background to other colors. When you choose a super light value of grey, it can have an ethereal, cloud-like look and feel that even mixes well with other neutrals. For example, your rug can feature only values of grey or include soft blue, white and beige mixed with grey for a more interesting neutral palette. Add a textured throw and pillows along with furniture in shinier finishes to keep your neutral color scheme from looking flat. Power It Up || Amp up the elegance and grandeur of your space by using deeper greys like graphite, charcoal or wrought iron. Contrast them with pale pink, soft lavender or mustard hues, or make a bold statement by mixing grey with amethyst, hot pink or citron. For a more masculine approach, try using grey with brown or burgundy, perhaps on an upholstered chair or with accent pillows. Gold, silver and black in either matte or shiny finishes will also keep grey from feeling too sedate. Finishing Touches || Change up your greys anytime with colorful accents in other colors like red, black, blue or green. For example, incorporate a lamp with a jade base, or a patterned chair with rose, turquoise and terracotta hues to create a beautiful, rich complement to your grey foundation.
Blue & White || From nautical navy and white to chinoiserie patterns, this combo always looks fresh Certain color combinations have truly stood the test of time, none more so than blue and white. When it comes to interiors – outdoors, too – blue and white always looks fresh, cool, crisp and sophisticated. From bold, poolside cabana striped draperies to richly-patterned chinoiserie vases and ginger jars, this timeless pairing works equally well in solid blocks of color or intricate patterns. It's particularly strong in cooling down summer outside settings, but for warmth and zing, add orange, pink or yellow. And, you can use blue and white in any room – think of a guest bedroom covered in French toile de jouy (twal-duh-zhwee) fabric, the aforementioned chinoiserie vases scattered around a living room, or a serene bedroom with muted versions of blue with white for comforters, pillows, and window treatments. However you incorporate it, blue and white just feels right. However you incorporate it, blue and white just feels right. Sky-View Seats || It's not surprising…according to many surveys, America's favorite color is blue. It's almost never jarring, but calm and cool, though it does feel more energetic in saturated versions of navy, royal blue, and turquoise. And, it's readily available on upholstered furniture, from dining and accent chairs to upholstered beds, sofas and ottomans, as well as every kind of accessory. Metal or wicker outdoor furniture is often painted white, with classic navy blue cushions for an inviting summer look.   Coastal Connotations || There's nothing better than relaxing by the ocean, lake or pool. Blue sky, blue water, white sand – we're intrinsically drawn to these coastal hues because they are so prevalent in nature. And even though grey is an enduring color go-to, we don't long for a grey sky the way we do blue. You can create coastal vibes in any room using blue and white, especially if you mix in variations like cornflower, periwinkle or powder blue. Sometimes you can find many variations in one area rug that can act as a springboard for creating an oasis of calm.   Cool Accents || If you have a neutral-hued room, add some color with blue patterned pillows, and for porch, deck or patio, get them in Sunbrella weather-resistant fabrics. For dining, set a table with blue and white patterned dinnerware mixed with cobalt water goblets, plus blue and white floral table linens for a fresh look. Typically, bathrooms are white, so towels and rugs with blue in them beautifully complement white tile and porcelain. Or, try painting a light blue ceiling in a white room for a tranquil feeling every time you look up. This technique is often used to great effect on porches, where Southern tradition says a "haint blue" ceiling will ward off evil spirits.
Rugs are a fantastic way to define a space. Choosing a rug for your dining space might seem overwhelming at first, but if you’re mindful of the following three design tips you’ll shop confidently. Fabrication || If the rug is going in your main dining area then it will need to withstand frequent foot traffic. The two best fabrications are Hand Tufted and Machine Woven. Both fabrications are durable and stain resistant. Hand Tufted is only available in wool and can shed excess fibers when new so be sure to vacuum frequently at first! Machine Woven is available in synthetic fabrics and is great for those suffering with allergies. If your dining space is in an area that sees a lot of sunlight synthetic is the way to go as it won’t fade as fast. Pattern & Color || The rug is the foundation of the space. Choose whether or not you want the rug to make a statement or simply enhance the furniture. If you are just starting to design your dining space, a rug is a great way to determine your color story. Patterned rugs will feature multiple colors which gives you the opportunity to incorporate a few different hues into your overall design. Spaces that are already saturated with design or color are better suited for a rug in muted hues and subtle patterns. Shapes & Sizes || All legs of the chairs should remain on the rug even when the chair is pulled away from the table. No one enjoys taking a seat and having their chair get tripped up because the rug is too small. When measuring your table and chairs, add 18” – 24” to the measurements to ensure this doesn’t happen. Square tables should always be placed on a square rug, while round tables could be placed on either a round or square rug. Rectangular tables are best on a rectangular rug to play up the shape. Don’t forget the rug pad! Not only will it prevent the rug from sliding around, it will also protect your floors and extend the life of your rug. Rug pads will last forever and can be used interchangeably as long as the rug size and shape stays the same.     
What once was a faux pas has now become an edgy home design trend that we like to call the art of mixing patterns and textures. Much like fashion, the common fear when it comes to experimenting with design trends is the fear of the unknown. You see it in a magazine and think “I love the way this looks, but this won’t work in my home” but it COULD as long as you keep these tips in mind… Variety in Scale || Think in order of large to small when picking your patterns. The larger patterns should be chosen in the form of your rug, drapes, accent chair, or any other large scale pieces in the room so the entire print is visible. This pattern will be the most impactful one in the room so be sure you pick one that you won’t get tired of or in an element that can easily be switched out such as drapes or an area rug. Once you have the large pattern you can start to layer in those smaller patterns or textures; three is ideal but no more than five depending on the size of the room. Layering in Texture || If your two patterns are the main focal point in the room, incorporating texture for the third layer will not only add depth to your design, it will also thread everything together. Just be mindful when choosing the intensity of the texture so it doesn’t compete with the prints you’ve chosen. The same rule applies if you decide to focus on two bold textures; keep the pattern light and subtle so it enhances the overall look. A Common Thread || Fluidity in design is key when mixing patterns and textures. This can be achieved by establishing a solid foundation and threading each layer of your design together with a common element whether it is color or theme of print. Example: a geometric printed rug paired with a heavily textured sofa decorated with floral pillows; staying within a common color scheme will harmonize the prints and texture flawlessly.
Dining spaces. We all have them whether it's an entire room or just a nook carved out of a larger room, but it's a space that is traditionally driven more by functionality than fashion. Get creative by styling a dining space that is as thoughtfully curated as your living room or bedroom. Dine in style with these tips… Deconstructed Dining || Forgo uniform dining sets and opt for buying dining separates. Even the most modern dining sets can feel stuffy because they are just so… perfect. Think of your dining set like your family – while you all share similar qualities, you're not all exactly the same. Piece together your dining set starting with the dining table. Thoughtful Texture || Cozy up the space by adding unexpected texture that encourages your guest to stay around the table and enjoy good conversation and laughter. Soften seating by adding cushions, throws, or even a small sheepskin pelt! Go green while adding a pop of color or pattern to your look by using cloth napkins. Finish off the look with fresh flowers, not fake ones! This will keep your look constantly evolving so you never get tired of looking at the same centerpiece – plus they smell great! Mixed-Matched Chairs || Your dining table is the neutral piece of the design giving you the flexibility to get really creative with your chair ion! As with any other décor, be mindful of the styles, colors, or patterns you mix. There should still be at least one common thread that keeps the overall look cohesive while still being perfectly imperfect. For example; if you have four different silhouettes paint them the same color or vice versa. Another great contrast is mixing modern with vintage!
Few core items you use to decorate your home are as important as area rugs. In addition to setting the tone for your space, they need to be durable, especially in high-traffic areas, and they should tie a room's colors and style together with tireless beauty. And, if placed over hardwood floors, they offer protection, warmth and comfort underfoot. Many designers suggest creating a scheme for your room using the colors and patterns of your rug, though there are so many styles available, it's easy enough to find a rug that complements what you already have in your space. When choosing an area rug, consider other shapes besides rectangles, think of abstract designs vs. traditional patterns, and, depending on space, you can use more than one in the same room. As always, if your rug is on a hardwood floor, be sure to use a rug pad underneath to prevent slipping. Alternative Shapes || Look around your room. It's most likely square or rectangular. Much of your case furniture is probably similar in shape. So why not counteract the 90-degree angles with a rug that's oval instead of rectangular? Or, round or hexagonal? You could even go with a figural-shaped rug, maybe shaped like a surfboard or hibiscus flower if it's a tropical-themed bathroom. Since an area rug really anchors your space, you should choose one that inspires you, and that you love to look at every day. Patterns vs. Solids/Abstracts || You have endless rug choices to make your space come alive. Traditional, intricate patterns offer visual splendor, and some new rugs are designed to look like vintage antiques, which add a curated, lived-in look to your room. You should also decide if you want rich saturated colors to make a dramatic statement or softer, faded hues to calm things down. Modern abstract patterns or "almost solids" also work beautifully, especially if you want wall art or furniture to really be the stars. In bedrooms, you probably want a rug with a higher pile to keep it warm and toasty. If you're in a more temperate climate, natural fiber rugs like sisal feel and look great, both inside and outside.   Multiples in One Room || If you have a large open space, say, a living room that flows into a dining room, it usually makes sense to place one rug under your dining room furniture, and one under your living room furniture. You can use rugs to further define seating areas. For example, you might have one rug anchoring a sofa and chairs for TV watching, and a separate rug for an adjacent conversation area with chairs arranged around a cocktail table. And, rugs you place in the same room don't have to match, though they should still work with the overall colors and décor of the space to keep everything cohesive.
One of nature's most prominent hues is about to make a welcome return with the start of spring this month. From an interior design standpoint, green can be tricky to work with, often because it takes on so many different casts depending on lighting and the other colors used around it. This is especially true of paint colors. The classic adage, "if it works in nature, it will work in your home," definitely applies to green. Just think of how great live plants look in any room. Depending on saturation, texture, and which variations you use, green can be soothing or energizing. If it's been awhile since you've considered it, maybe now is the time to put some fresh greens on your design plate.   Calming Approaches || Sage. Mint. Forest. Moss. Seafoam. Olive. Aloe. Celery. These are some of the greens that nourish and soothe, much as they do in the natural world. Note that many of these can be dark and saturated and still exude calm, much like a dark forest with filtered sunlight through treetops can feel very peaceful. In the same way, mint, celery, seafoam and aqua are often associated with tropical beaches, which can feel both peaceful and visually lively at the same time. In terms of your interior space, almost any type of wood furniture looks great with greens, whether it's a green upholstered chair or a walnut credenza against a mint green painted wall. Or, place a wood cabinet with a green distressed painted finish in a kitchen or hallway to add vintage character.   Wake-up Call Approaches || Shamrock. Kelly. Emerald. Chartreuse. Lime. These tend to dazzle the eye, create excitement, and energize the soul with their sharper intensity. They will gain even more strength when paired with other vibrant hues like royal purple, hot pink or the traditional holiday pairing with red, which works well because green and red are opposites on the color wheel. In terms of a room, a modern glass-top table, for example, will pair beautifully with lacquered emerald-green walls in an entranceway. Mixed Greens || Much like a grouping of plants, different greens can blend beautifully. For example, pair two upholstered accent chairs, one in chartreuse next to one in kelly green, and it will make the room look fresh, lively and eclectic. Fabric patterns on throw pillows can also coordinate well, such as a palm frond print pillow mixed with, say, pillows with small-scale green and white stripes. Mix in a pair of ceramic garden stools and live plants, and you can easily create a lush garden feel indoors, even if you live in a city apartment. It's easy using green. Green is everywhere!
There is no better time like the start of a new season to test out new trends! From fashion to home décor, spring is a time of renewal so refresh yourself and your home with one or all of these budding trends… Pastels || Candy-colored hues like mint green and the ever-popular blush have been flooding the scene in the form of linens, accent chairs, and even walls! This cheerful yet somewhat subdued color story evokes a whimsical vibe that is sure to enliven your home. Botanicals || Bring the outdoors inside by filling your home with plants! Don’t have a green thumb? That shouldn’t stop you from participating in this revitalizing trend. Cacti, succulents, and monstera plants are great for first-time plant owners because they require little maintenance! Textures || Whether it’s macramé wall hangings, distressed or carved tables, or textured ceramics, texture is prominent this season. Texture adds a layer of luxe without competing with existing colors and patterns making it an easy trend to incorporate in your home. Terrazzo || Like sprinkles on an ice cream cone, terrazzo is marble and granite’s playful cousin. From bathroom tiles to accent tables to hardware, this surface can make its debut in your home in a small or big way. Metallics || The element that is so consistently on trend that at this point it is a design staple. However, they remain on “trend” lists because the way they are styled is forever evolving. Right now it’s all about mixing metals to create an effortlessly glam look.
The industry’s top home furnishing designers gathered in High Point, NC to showcase their latest collection to prospecting retail buyers and interior designers for the biannual High Point Market. High Point Market is the equivalent to Fashion Week in the fashion world – it is the largest home furnishings industry trade show in the world, providing insight to new products and the latest trends in home décor… Mixed Media || Unique materials like concrete, metal, and stone are paired with more traditional elements like glass and wood to create an unexpected twist on classic silhouettes. Highlights include pieces like a writing desk or sofa table that feature metal bases topped with stone. Va Va Velvet || What once was a textile we only saw in the fall and winter months is now making an appearance in spring and summer! Slightly lighter in texture for the season, this fabric is being shown in both airy pastels and bold brights from pillows to ottomans to add a fun punch of color to your home. Flora & Fauna || While it’s not out of the ordinary to see an abundance of floral patterns for the warmer months, this design staple was spiced up with a dash of fauna this season! Birds and blooms mingle with leafy vines on poufs, bedding, and accent chairs. Nature's Neutrals || Bring the outdoors inside with textural raffia, rattan, or wicker. Furniture constructed of these natural elements provide a lighter look for the season while maintaining a refined look. Go coastal with the addition of shiplap or rope elements. Perfectly Imperfect || The Japanese design aesthetic known as wabi sabi – the art of living with imperfection, was prominent at this market. The trend highlights the inherent beauty of asymmetry and furniture pieces that are designed to purposefully look unfinished.
By now, you know about the many benefits of indoor plants – they help purify the air, reduce stress and background noise, and improve your mood, in addition to being naturally beautiful. You can also add life to your space with other naturally occurring items like coral, seashells, petrified wood, geodes, plus textured fibers like macramé, abaca, jute, grasscloth and sisal. Adding these natural elements brings earthy textures to your décor, and increases the tranquility of your space. You can use these elements in subtle or big ways, and they work especially well in casual, boho-inspired interiors. Fish tanks and fountains optional.   Natural Found Collections || You can easily add natural beauty to your home by gathering your seashell or beach rock collection, putting it in a woven basket, and placing it next to a group of plants. A branch of coral is another classic touch, often displayed atop glass coffee tables or on book shelves. Other shore items like starfish, sea urchins and sea glass are inexpensive, readily available collectibles that can be gathered in groups or scattered randomly to charming rustic effect.   Furniture & Rugs || There are plenty of ways to use natural elements to make a bigger impact. In addition to natural wicker, rattan or rope accent furniture, you can complete a seating group with an eye-catching geode-topped accent table or tree stump table that's anything but cookie cutter. Each one will feature unique variations in color, pattern and shape. Ground your space, inside or out, with an environmentally-friendly natural fiber area rug that's both resilient and easy to coordinate with most design schemes. Accent Pieces || Geodes in their organic form can be striking, and appear in many gorgeous colors, including purple, blue, pink and green. Arrange them inside an open clam shell for an artful presentation. The aforementioned coral makes a great decorative accent, maybe on a tray with other objects or under a glass cloche. A natural woven sunburst mirror adds coastal charm when placed above your dresser, or use it to embellish a bare wall in an entranceway. Finally, if natural elements aren't your favorite décor go-tos, framed botanical prints work especially well in a formal grouping on your wall.