Distinctive Accents || Make your home uniquely yours with accent tables, clocks, mirrors & more In almost every story, the main character needs a sidekick – someone to interact with and play off of. The same is true of rooms in your home. Your living room furniture needs a supporting mirror, clock, accent table or objects to give it life. Most of all, these supporting accents should include details that speak to you. As many an interior designer has stated, these pieces make up the "jewelry" of a room, much like the finishing touches to your fashion wardrobe. These are easy to switch out when seasons change or for special holidays, or if you just want something new. In addition, accents don't have to hide in the background. An oversized vintage-style clock or decorative mirror, for example, can be a main focus for an entire wall. Ultimately, an eclectic diversity of accents will make your rooms more interesting, invite conversations, and create fascinating twists to your story. Accents…can be a main focus for an entire wall. Collections || Souvenirs from your travels will make any home more distinctive, and remind you of memorable destinations you've visited over the years. Quirky masks or hats on the wall, trinket boxes, sculptures, busts, glass vases, and books on a coffee table mingle with ease among other objects in your room. Displaying artwork is a great way to showcase your unique personality, whether you choose family photos, colorful abstract paintings, vintage travel posters grouped and expertly framed, or anything else that reveals your passions.   Colors & Patterns || Toss pillows are the easiest way to add instant pizzazz to your furniture. Try other shapes in addition to square – round, rectangular or organic shapes add depth to your upholstered furniture, as well as comfort. Play with different scales, too. Mix large leaf prints with, say, a mini cross-hatched pattern. Lamps are another way to add color and pattern, especially if you choose a shade that isn't solid white, or one with a colorful sculpted base.   Contrasts || If your main furniture is wood, add metallic accent tables for shine. In addition to their multifunctional uses, your room will have greater depth if you mix matte and shiny surfaces, which you can also achieve with paint or wallpaper. Even better, if your furniture is mostly square or rectangular, mix in other shapes like round, octagonal, triangular or organic shapes for added interest. If your walls are white, artwork in black frames look chic, especially when configured in multiples.
When a piece of furniture or object is lovingly used over time, it can develop a rich, distressed patina that tells its whole life story. Think of a wooden table from an old workshop with metal drawer pulls that are darkened from years of use, or a marble countertop from a decades-old hotel kitchen, discolored and buttery smooth from wear. These characteristic imperfections are often indications of a time when furniture and household items were handcrafted, when country life prevailed, and homey, rustic objects were used, handed down, and reused. Today, this type of "farmhouse style" – which, incidentally, blends easily with boho, shabby chic and industrial styles – has become one of our most enduring decorating trends. And, short of incorporating actual antiques into your home, it's easy to find new furniture and objects intentionally made to look like weathered antiques. The secret to distressed pieces is simplicity. They look and feel lived-in, comfortable, unpretentious – the opposite of slick and shiny. Furniture || The idea behind distressed furniture – and why it has such charm – is that each piece has subtle variations in surface appearance, so no two are exactly alike. Before the Industrial Revolution, variations were naturally occurring, but once items became mass produced, each one started out exactly alike with uniform surfaces and details. For today's distressed furniture, surface imperfections are desirable, with variations in color and finish intentional. In addition to wood, other materials, including metal, glass, stone, and plastic, can be made to look distressed.   Area Rugs || Previously, the only way you could really get a "distressed" rug was from years of walking on it. Now you can find new rugs that have worn patches of faded color that truly look vintage, but are deliberately created in factories using special manufacturing and finishing techniques. Most rugs were and are built to withstand plenty of wear and tear, and can become more beautiful as they age. Finishing Touches || Mirrors, clocks, plaster busts (more popular than ever!), woven baskets, architectural salvage, metal gates and grates, stained glass window panels, books and other items, can all be found in true vintage distressed form. Or, you can buy attractive reproductions made to look as though you've curated them from years of global travel. Ideally, your home will look more unique if you mix true vintage items with newer items. It's even more interesting if you mix styles and time periods for an eclectic look that tells your personal design story.